Best of Houzz Service Award for 2019! by Amy Martin

Amy Martin Landscape Design of Cohasset

Awarded Best Of Houzz 2019

Awarded by Community of Over 40 Million Monthly Users, Annual BOH Badge Highlights Home Remodeling & Design Professionals with Top Ratings and Most Popular Home Designs

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Cohasset, MA, January 24, 2019Amy Martin Landscape Design (AMLD) of Cohasset has won “Best Of Customer Service” on Houzz®, the leading platform for home renovation and design. The 15-year-old firm, focused on creating stunning outdoor living spaces and sustainable properties, was chosen by the more than 40 million monthly unique users that comprise the Houzz community from among more than 2.1 million active home building, remodeling and design industry professionals.


The Best Of Houzz badge is awarded annually, in three categories: Design, Customer Service and Photography. Design awards honor professionals whose work was the most popular among the Houzz community. Customer Service honors are based on several factors, including a pro's overall rating on Houzz and client reviews submitted in 2018. Architecture and interior design photographers whose images were most popular are recognized with the Photography award.


A “Best Of Houzz 2019” badge will appear on winners’ profiles as a sign of their commitment to excellence. These badges help homeowners identify popular and top-rated home professionals in every metro area on Houzz.


“Collaboration with the homeowners, engineers, and architects always results in the best designs.  We strive to clearly communicate ideas and understand our customer’s expectations to enable the best possible outcome for your project.”


"Best of Houzz is a true badge of honor as it is awarded by our community of homeowners, those who are hiring design, remodeling and other home improvement professionals for their projects,” said Liza Hausman, vice president of Industry Marketing for Houzz. “We are excited to celebrate the 2019 winners chosen by our community as their favorites for home design and customer experience, and to highlight those winners on the Houzz website and app."


Follow AMLD on Houzz https://www.houzz.com/pro/amymartindesigns


About AMLD

At Amy Martin Landscape Design, our goal is to help people live in closer connection to nature through luxurious outdoor living spaces on environmentally healthy properties.  Through Amy's unique process of defining your style and goals, and her analysis of the site's distinguishing attributes, she weaves together a dynamic master plan that gives your property a unified, distinct style, with spaces that flow and make sense.


About Houzz

Houzz is the leading platform for home remodeling and design, providing people with everything they need to improve their homes from start to finish – online or from a mobile device. From decorating a small room to building a custom home and everything in between, Houzz connects millions of homeowners, home design enthusiasts and home improvement professionals across the country and around the world. With the largest residential design database in the world and a vibrant community empowered by technology, Houzz is the easiest way for people to find inspiration, get advice, buy products and hire the professionals they need to help turn their ideas into reality. Headquartered in Palo Alto, Calif., Houzz also has international offices in London, Berlin, Sydney, Moscow, Tel Aviv and Tokyo. Houzz is a registered trademark of Houzz Inc. worldwide. For more information, visit houzz.com.





Southern New England Home features our Harbor View project! by Amy Martin

The article ‘Swaths of Serenity’ features our Harbor View project

The article ‘Swaths of Serenity’ features our Harbor View project

We were so happy when Southern New England Home featured our Harbor View project in their article ‘Swaths of Serenity’ this fall, 2018. They did a great job describing our approach to creating naturalistic landscapes, using native plants to create healthy ecosystems and managing stormwater with swales that lead to rain gardens.

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Button Up Your Overcoat... by Amy Martin

 It’s winter in New England, and the cold has seriously settled in. Shortly after I’m chilled to the bone, my thoughts go out to all the plants we’ve installed around the Boston metro and I worry about how they will endure the winter. The warm temperatures this fall prevented plants from receiving their seasonal message to induce dormancy, so when the cold temperatures hit, they won’t be hardened off and ready to take the hit. Newly planted plants are the most vulnerable, but even well established landscapes, as well as native woodlands, can lose the battle when temperatures take extreme swings. Coastal areas get beaten up by the desiccating winds off of the ocean, and evergreens take the brunt of the punishment. 

The best way to protect evergreens throughout the winter is to wrap them in burlap, which protects them against frost, heavy snowfall, windburn and deer browsing. Even the New York Times has an article on the practice, especially in the Hamptons, where entire landscapes wrapped for protection begin to look like works of art.

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https://mobile.nytimes.com/2017/12/27/style/burlap-your-estate-darling.html?referer=http://m.facebook.comsk 

The article features “Antonio Sanches, a landscape contractor some consider as much artist as gardener. For the last month, Mr. Sanches and his crew have leapfrogged from modest backyards to multi-million-dollar estates throughout the Hamptons, unspooling and cutting $200 rolls of burlap and stitching them into slipcovers for virtually anything green.”

Although Mr. Sanches estimates that the cost of winter-proofing an average manicured backyard is roughly $1,000 a season, most moderately sized properties cost closer to $500-$700 per season.  

David La Spina for The New York Times

David La Spina for The New York Times

When spring comes and the Rhododendrons are blooming amongst lush foliage, the boxwoods look healthy and the arborvitae’s have retained their columnar shape, putting up with a bit of burlap for the winter seems a small price to pay.